The Better Choice – RESINATING® Fiberglass Expansion Liners

Overview

The decision to select a method for repairing a manhole or pipe in a waste water or storm water system is dependent on a number of factors…financial costs, warranties, expected useful life, risks, and social costs among others.

  • Trench and Replace
  • CIPP
  • SIPP

Each of these methods is covered in its individual section.  After reviewing this Overview section, one can use the links to the left to go to a specific explanation of why RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners are superior to a particular method OR one can scroll down this whole tab to capture the broadest perspective.

The major benefits of RESINATING Liners developed in this, “The Better Choice” tab, and in other sections of the website include:

  • The fact that a RESINATING Liner is 100% leakproof and impervious to corrosion from any chemical or biological agents found in waste water, storm water, fresh water and many industrial and commercial liquids,
  • The incredible strength and structural integrity of a RESINATING Liner,
  • The indestructible nature of RESINATING’s fiberglass,
  • The 20-year repair or replace warranty associated with RESINATING Liners if they were to leak,
  • The likely useful life of RESINATING Liners — 100 years and perhaps more,
  • The elimination of virtually all excavation, traffic congestion, hazardous waste removal, resurfacing and landscaping costs associated with Trench & Replace,
  • The lack of health risks like those associated with styrene and various VOC’s that are released during the installation of CIPP,
  • The rapid pace at which RESINATING Liners can be installed – a typical manhole can be lined in a day as can several hundred feet of pipe,
  • The savings associated with using RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners, both upfront and over the life of a rehabilitation project…

…these are the major factors that will propel RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners forward, displacing other rehabilitation methods.  As municipalities, engineering firms and general contractors get involved with RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners, their likely conclusions will be the same as RESINATING’s…RESINATING Liners will drive dramatic change in the way manholes and pipes are kept in good repair.

This page explains Why RESINATING Liners are “The Better Choice”

Compared to RESINATING Liners, everything else is a temporary fix!

Before getting to the specific comparisons of RESINATING Liners to each other method listed above, let’s briefly review what a RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner is.

A RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner, typically a cylinder, but available in many other shapes – conical, oval and domed, for example, is fabricated as a solid fiberglass structure of the proper length, diameter and thickness to match the requirements of each specific project.

RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners can be fabricated in diameters up to 192” and lengths of up to 18’ with thicknesses typically ranging from ¼” to ½” or up to 2” or more as needed.

The RESINATING Liner is then cut axially enabling it to be compressed to a smaller size so that it can be easily inserted into a pipe or into a manhole through the manhole opening.  For example, a 54” diameter RESINATING Liner was inserted into a manhole with an opening that was 20” wide.

Once inserted in the pipe or manhole, the RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner is then expanded and bonded securely to the existing walls of the pipe or manhole using RESINATING’s proprietary bonding agent at which point the seams and joints are sealed.

With its patent pending, RESINATING Liners create a leakproof seal while strengthening the existing pipe or manhole structure to the point that it’s substantially stronger than it was when it was new.

One of RESINATING’s installers putting the finishing touches on a seam that was glassed over in a 20’ deep manhole in Lewisville, Texas.  It’s almost ready to close up with a new corbel.

With the RESINATING Liner bonded to the walls of the existing manhole and the new corbel fiberglassed to the Liner, this manhole, like the other manholes and pipes that are lined with RESINATING Liners, will provide great service for the next 100 years or more as it remains leakproof while providing enhanced structural integrity to the existing manhole that it lined.

More specific information about RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners themselves and their companion products can be found in the Products Tab on this website.

How do RESINATING Liners compare to Trench & Replace?

Trench & Replace is certainly the most expensive way to “rehabilitate” a pipe or manhole.  ALL Trench & Replace options have a much higher upfront cost than using RESINATING Liners to rehabilitate a pipe or a manhole.  ALL Trench & Replace options also have a much higher total cost over their lifetime.

  • The upfront financial costs of digging a trench, removing existing pipe, hauling away hazardous waste, installing new pipe and restoring the landscaping or repaving the roadway are eliminated when RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners are used.
  • The upfront social costs of congestion, disruption, blocked driveways and the release of environmentally unsafe gases and the presence of hazardous waste in the construction area are also eliminated when RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners are used.
  • The longer-term costs of relining again to deal with the I&I as it returns as the new pipe ages, adds a new round of financial and social costs to an already adverse situation.

RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners can rehabilitate all types of pipe…RCP, FRP, VCP, Brick, Cast Iron, etc, avoiding the need to do an expensive Trench & Replace project with all its costs.

Trench & Replace should only be considered in two specific situations:

  • SITUATION #1: If the existing pipe is so totally collapsed that a RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner cannot be used to rehabilitate the pipe or manhole. For perspective, however, if about 180 degrees or more of the pipe remains, the RESINATING process can clean the collapse out, reline the pipe with a RESINATING Liner and then pour concrete over the exposed part of the RESINATING Liner for added coverage.
    Here’s an example:Why do Trench & Replace just because of a collapse when one can simply RESINATE it? It is rare for a pipe to be so collapsed that the entire pipe needs to be replaced.  RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners can, at the very least, be used to rehabilitate those sections of a failing pipe where it isn’t totally collapsed beyond repair, saving substantial time and money.  A manhole or several hundred feet pipe can be rehabilitated using RESINATING Liners in a day.This eliminates most if not all Trench & Replace costs and complications.

    In many cases, RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner can even eliminate the need to Trench & Replace all “collapsed” sections if they aren’t too long.  Short “collapsed” sections can be used as insertion points for RESINATING Liners.There are many factors to consider in evaluating these situations.  Let Resinating LLC evaluate this “collapse” situation before a decision is made to spend significant extra money doing an unnecessary Trench & Replace.
  • SITUATION #2: The collapsed or damaged pipe needed to be replaced anyway to increase the capacity of the pipe.

Special Considerations when Trenching & Replacing with RCP:

  • RCP may well have to be lined with a RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner before the end of its claimed useful life, or before 50 years or before 20 years if one wants to address new I&I issues that won’t exist when RESINATING Liners are used. The cracks and resulting leaks occur in RCP because of the loading that RCP must bear and the corrosive environment that exists inside a waste water pipe.  Both combine to generate increasing I&I with age.
  • This additional cost to line the new RCP as it ages only worsens the already adverse financial picture associated with Trenching & Replacing. Lining the existing pipe with a RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner on Day 1 is the most cost-effective solution by far both on Day 1 and for the long term.
  • Utilizing RESINATING Liners to rehabilitate existing pipes provides significant incremental strength to the existing pipes that they rehabilitate, leaving them stronger than when they were new in spite of the cracks and leaks in the existing pipe. See the Technical Data Page on the Specifications and Tech Data Tab for ASTM test results relating to the strength of RESINATING Liners vs. RCP and FRP.
  • Also, RESINATING Liners are not affected by any chemical or biological agents present in a waste water or storm water system. So they not only provide added strength to an existing pipe that they are rehabilitating, they provide a completely leakproof lining.
  • RESINATING Liners carry a 20-year repair or replace warranty and have a likely useful life of 100 years, potentially longer. Why “potentially longer?”  Because RESINATING Liners are solid indestructible fiberglass. Review the 20-Year Warranty on the Warranty Tab.

Special Considerations when Trenching & Replacing with FRP:

  • Whether one is thinking about Trenching & Replacing a pipe requiring renewal with PVC or pipe such as Hobas and Flowtite that are made with fillers, FRP will likely have a much shorter useful life than RESINATING Liners with their likely useful life of 100 years or longer. RESINATING Liners are solid fiberglass with no fillers added.  Solid fiberglass is virtually indestructible.
  • FRP may also have much shorter useful life than the 20-year Warranty period associated with RESINATING Liners given their strength, durability and leakproof qualities.  See the Technical Data Page on the Specifications and Tech Data Tab for ASTM test results of the strength of RESINATING Liners vs FRP.
  • If so, if one uses FRP in a Trench & Replace project, one will likely have to reline that FRP with a RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner some years after its installation most likely due to deflection and cracking under load. This only further inflates the cost of Trench & Replace as in the case with RCP.
  • This link to an article on the situation in Bentonville makes this point clearly as it discusses Bentonville’s problems with 9-miles of Hobas pipe.

RESINATING Liners should be the Day 1 choice for rehabilitating a pipe, not Trench & ReplaceRESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners are simply the superior solution compared to Trench & Replace when pipes in a waste water or storm water system need to be rehabilitated.

RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners…THE BETTER CHOICE

…a much better choice than Trench & Replace

How do RESINATING Liners compare to CIPP in a Pipe?

The CIPP process has been around a long time and has garnered many followers.  The belief that CIPP was the best solution for rehabilitating sewer pipes was probably correct in many cases…until now.

Things are changing, now, however.  Check out Electro Scan’s April 16, 2020 Press Release.  The results of their work in 2019 can be summarized as follows:

  • Having scanned over 110,000 LF of CIPP liners in 2019, using its patented low voltage conductivity technology, Electro Scan found over 14,000 leaks…that’s one leak every 7.85’.
  • Over 80% of CIPP liners inspected had measurable defects contributing to unwanted inflow and infiltration (I&I).
  • 44% of liners had leaks of more than 20 Gallons per Minute.

The related Electro Scan inspection data from the March 11, 2020 Trenchless Technology Webinar sponsored by Electro Scan is in the table below on the left.  That table shows the severity of leaks PER CIPP DEFECT.  The resulting percentages of leaks within each range in the Electro Scan Table are on the right.

When the mid-point of each range (25 GPM for the highest range) is multiplied by the percentage of leaks within each range as shown in the table on the right, and they are summed, one finds that the AVERAGE LEAK after a pipe is lined with CIPP is 11.07 GPM.

What does that mean?  If one takes the fact that the leaks on average are 8’ apart as Electro Scans data shows, that means that after one mile of average pipe is lined with an average level of CIPP effectiveness, there is still 7,260 GPM of I&I, which translates to almost 10.5 Mil GPD of I&I.  And as the Electro Scan webinar pointed out, that I&I flow rate increases with time.

How do these CIPP results compare to the results one will get when RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners are used to rehabilitate a pipe?

  • RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners have a 20-year Warranty such that if any leakage occurs that materially and substantially adversely affects the performance of a pipe or manhole, RESINATING LLC will repair or replace its liner. Review the 20-Year Warranty on the Warranty Tab.
  • RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners have a likely useful life of 100 years or more.This long useful is life is due to the fact that:
  • RESINATING fiberglass has no fillers, rendering it virtually indestructible,
  • RESINATING Liners provide new strength to existing pipes so they can carry increased loads, and because,
  • RESINATING Liners are leakproof and impervious to any chemical or biological agents found in waste water, storm water or fresh water systems.

So, from a cost perspective, depending on the diameter of a pipe, RESINATING Liners may be more expensive than using CIPP on Day 1, about the same or less expensive…but not too far down the road there are substantial additional costs of treating I&I, more than enough to make up for any potential Day 1 difference if there is one.

What is the cost of treating I&I in a waste water treatment facility in a given locality?  If waste water treatment costs $500/MG, than based on the analysis above, the cost of treating the continuing I&I flow AFTER USING CIPP to renew a one mile pipe would be about $5,000/day, that’s almost $2,000,000/year.  Well before Day 365, any Day 1 cost differential would be more than covered.  Then the only remaining question is how long would one endure the cost of treating continuing I&I before that pipe is RELINED AGAIN, this time with RESINATING Liners?  Any money spent on lining the pipe with CIPP and on treating the I&I flow instead of rehabilitating that pipe with RESINATING Liners on Day 1 will have been wasted money.

The analysis above relates to relatively smaller diameter pipes on average.  What will the number of leaks per linear foot of pipe be when the diameter of the pipe being lined with CIPP increases?  The larger the diameter of the pipe, the greater the surface area of the CIPP.  It is only logical that the number of leaks and the number of GPD will increase.  Will the continuing I&I for a 36” pipe be twice that for an 18” pipe?  That would be a good guess.  Incidentally, RESINATING Liners can be fabricated in diameters up to 192”.

And one must not ignore the structural integrity that RESINATING Liners provide.  CIPP does not provide anywhere near the structural integrity that RESINATING Liners offer.  The reason one is rehabilitating a pipe is because of leaks.  When leaks occur, the structural integrity of the existing pipe is by definition compromised to a degree.  One cannot afford to have that structural integrity continue to degrade if one is to avoid other long term costs.  See the Technical Data Page on the Specifications and Tech Data Tab for ASTM test results of the strength of RESINATING Liners vs RCP and FRP.  Pipes lined with RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners create a structure that is stronger than the failing pipes were when they were new.

In addition to the cost comparison developed above, additional factors comparing the use of RESINATING Liners vs CIPP are in the table below.  These comparisons reflect RESINATING LLC’s assessment of using RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners vs. CIPP and are believed to be appropriate characterizations of RESINATING Liners vs CIPP.  The links in the table provide very important information that should be reviewed.

Specification/Guideline RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liner CIPP
Manufacturing Method IN FACTORY: A continuous fiberglass strand coated with a specific resin selected for the specific job is wound on a mandrel to create a liner section with the proper diameter and thickness to fit the pipe being repaired. The liner section is fully cured prior to shipment. ON-SITE: Felt and resin are encased in a flexible hose and cured in place in a pipe by a chemical reaction triggered by the injection of steam, hot water or UV as the catalyst.
Installation Method VIRTUALLY TRENCHLESS: The liner section is cut axially, compressed to a smaller diameter and inserted into the existing pipe through a manhole or via a small cut in the middle of the existing pipe. TRENCHLESS: The flexible hose is inserted inside the existing pipe before the catalyst is injected.
Bonding Method The walls of the existing pipe are coated with a proprietary bonding agent prior to the compressed liner being put in place and expanded. This secures the liner to the walls of the existing pipe and seals the seams. There is no separate bonding agent used to secure the cured-in-place liner to the existing pipe.
Installation Safety Issues None. Significant installation safety issues exist relating to the release of various carcinogens and other factors during the installation process. See this MIT article. The article includes a link to a detailed 2017 Purdue University research report worth reviewing. Also check out this Scientific American article.
Structural Strength The Manufacturing Method and the proprietary bonding agent give the failing RCP 50% more strength than new RCP alone. See ASTM D497 & ASTM D790 test results available on this website on the Tech Data Link of the Specifications and Tech Data Tab. CIPP Corporation says “The CIPP is designed to support the hydraulic loads due to groundwater, since the soil and surcharge loads can be supported by the original pipe.

That is UNLESS the original pipe is not structurally sound.

Effect on Pipe Capacity The low coefficient of friction and thinness of the Expansion Liner, typically ½” or less, could generate a moderate positive effect and minimize a negative effect if any occurs. The typically thicker nature of CIPP installations and their relatively coarse surface, particularly as they age, can potentially degrade the capacity of the pipe.
Warranty Period 20 Years. Typical construction warranty for CIPP is 1 year.” See the 3rd point in the NASSCO Specifications Guidelines
Likely Useful Life 100 years.

The design life is 100 years.

RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners are 100% leak proof and completely impervious to the chemical or biological agents in municipal wastewater.

Undefined, but issues ranging from small leaks to serious damage while jetting clogs to major failures may occur sooner than expected.

See YouTube videos for examples.

CIPP Failure 1

CIPP Failure 2

Cost Life time cost of RESINATING’S Fiberglass Expansion Liners is substantially less than that of CIPP given the likely limitations of its useful life, the likely need to install a RESINATING Liner later and the costs of treating any leakage of storm water that occurs as CIPP ages. The initial cost of CIPP is comparable to or potentially less than that of RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners but the total cost of CIPP over the remaining life of the existing pipe is substantially higher than that of using RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners starting on Day 1, especially considering the added cost of continuing I&I flow as calculated above based on the Electro Scan data.

Clearly, RESINATING Liners should be the Day 1 choice for rehabilitating a pipe, not CIPPRESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners are simply a superior solution compared to CIPP when pipes in a waste water or storm water system need to be rehabilitated.

RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners…THE BETTER CHOICE

…a much better choice than CIPP

How do RESINATING Liners compare to SIPP in a Manhole?

RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners provides the best medium and long term solution for manholes that are generating significant amounts of I&I and/or are deteriorating structurally.

Due to the fact that RESINATING Liners have a likely useful life of 100 years and perhaps more, when that is compared to the much shorter likely useful life for a manhole lined with SIPP as our press release on the TRA Experience shows, it is clear that the Day 1 cost of SIPP, even if it happens to be less than the Day 1 cost of a RESINATING Liner, is not telling the full story of the cost of using SIPP to line a manhole.

While data doesn’t exist as yet on the continuing cost of treating I&I in an SIPP lined manhole, it is not unreasonable to think that it is similar per linear foot of a manhole as shown in the CIPP section above.

And, as with CIPP, one must not ignore the structural integrity that RESINATING Liners provide.  SIPP does not provide anywhere near the structural integrity that RESINATING Liners offer.  The typical reason one is rehabilitating a manhole is that it leaks.  When leaks occur, the structural integrity of the existing pipe is by definition compromised to a degree.  One cannot afford to have that structural integrity continue to degrade if one is to avoid other long term costs.  See the Technical Data Page on the Specifications and Tech Data Tab for ASTM test results of the strength of RESINATING Liners vs RCP and FRP.  Manholes lined with RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners create a structure that is stronger than when the failing pipes were when they were new.

And of course, if the problem associated with a manhole is it’s structural integrity, there are only two choices:

  • Rehabilitate the manhole with a RESINATING Liner, or
  • Do a very costly Trench & Replace, as elaborated on in the Trench & Replace section above.

In addition to these cost considerations, additional factors comparing the use of RESINATING Liners vs SIPP are in the table below.  These comparisons reflect RESINATING LLC’s assessment of using RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners vs SIPP and are believed to be appropriate characterizations of RESINATING Liners vs SIPP.  Be sure to check out the link to the TRA Press Release in the table.

Specification/Guideline Resinating Fiberglass
Expansion Liner
SIPP
Manufacturing Method IN FACTORY:  A continuous fiberglass strand coated with a specific resin selected for the specific job is wound on a mandrel to create a liner section with the proper diameter and thickness to fit the pipe being repaired.  The liner section is fully cured prior to shipment. ON-SITE: Spraying a coating in the manhole.
Installation Method TRENCHLESS: The liner section is cut axially, compressed to a smaller diameter and inserted into the existing manhole through its opening. Review the slide show on the St. Paul, Kansas thumbnail in the Installation Examples Tab. TRENCHLESS: A sprayer is lowered into the manhole to spray the side of the manhole.
Bonding Method The wall and floor of the existing manhole are coated with a proprietary bonding agent prior to the fiberglass floor being installed and the compressed liner being put in place and expanded, .  The liner and the floor are then glassed together as is the seam and any joints, resulting in a manhole that is 100% leakproof. There is no separate bonding agent used to secure the SIPP liner to the existing manhole walls resulting in no added strength and easier leakage.
Installation Safety Issues None. Unknown.
Structural Strength The Manufacturing Method and the proprietary bonding agent combine to enhance the structural strength of a manhole substantially.  Resinating Liners for example gave failing RCP 50% more strength than new RCP alone. See ASTM D497 & ASTM D790 test results available at the Tech Data Page of the Specifications and Tech Data Tab.  Likewise, the Resinating Fiberglass Expansion Liner greatly strengthens a brick manhole. There is no incremental structural strength associated with an SIPP liner.
Warranty Period 20 Years. Unknown.  Perhaps 1 year.
Likely Useful Life  100 years and perhaps more. The design life is 100 years. Resinating Fiberglass Expansion Liners are 100% leak proof and completely impervious to the chemical or biological agents in municipal wastewater. Based on the experience that the Trinity River Authority in Texas has had with SIPP, the likely useful life of an SIPP lining is in the range of 3 to 4 years or so.  Details on the TRA Experience can be found in the Press Release Tab of this website.
Cost Life time cost of RESINATING’S Fiberglass Expansion Liners is substantially less than that of an SIPP liner given its limited useful life, and the need to install a Resinating Liner at some later point and the treatment costs for any leakage of storm water that occurs as SIPP ages. The initial cost of the SIPP is likely somewhat less than that of RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners but the total cost of SIPP over the remaining life of the RCP or brick manhole is substantially higher than that of using RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners starting on Day 1. It is highly likely that a RESINATING Liner will need to be installed down the road as the SIPP fails.

Clearly, RESINATING Liners should be the Day 1 choice for rehabilitating a manhole, not SIPPRESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners are simply a superior solution compared to SIPP when manholes in a waste water or storm water system need to be rehabilitated.

RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners…THE BETTER CHOICE

…a much better choice than SIPP

In Summary

When one considers all the advantages of RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners highlighted in the Overview Section of this tab as well as in the various comparison sections, it is difficult to conceive of a choice that would be superior to the choice of using RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners.

  • The fact that a RESINATING Liner is 100% leakproof and impervious to corrosion from any chemical or biological agents found in waste water, storm water, fresh water and many other industrial and commercial liquids,
  • The incredible strength and structural integrity of a RESINATING Liner,
  • The indestructible nature of RESINATING’s fiberglass,
  • The 20-year repair or replace warranty associated with RESINATING Liners if they were to leak,
  • The likely useful life of RESINATING Liners — 100 years and perhaps more,
  • The elimination of virtually all excavation, traffic congestion, hazardous waste removal, resurfacing and landscaping costs associated with Trench & Replace,
  • The lack of health risks like those associated with styrene and various VOC’s that are released during the installation of CIPP,
  • The rapid pace at which RESINATING Liners can be installed – a typical manhole can be lined in a day as can several hundred feet of pipe,
  • The savings associated with using RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners, both upfront and over the life of a rehabilitation project…

…these are the major factors that will propel RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners forward, displacing other rehabilitation methods.  As municipalities, engineering firms and general contractors get involved with RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners, their likely conclusions will be the same as RESINATING’s…RESINATING Liners will drive dramatic change in the way manholes and pipes are kept in good repair.

RESINATING Fiberglass Expansion Liners…THE BETTER CHOICE

For more information, click the “Learn More” links, explore the other tabs on the website, or Contact Us.